Leicester United Caribbean Association

p16445coll8_27_medium.jpg

Title

Leicester United Caribbean Association

Subject

Leicester United Caribbean Association

Description

Donna Jackman and Charmaine Blake discuss the activities of the Leicester United Caribbean Association (LUCA) in the 1980s.

Creator

Colin Hyde

Source

Colin Hyde

Publisher

University of Leicester Special Collections

Date

2015

Contributor

Photograph courtesy of Colin Hyde. To use seek permission from http://specialcollections.le.ac.uk/digital/collection/p16445coll8/id/27/rec/11

Rights

You may use this item in accordance with the licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

Format

.mp3

Type

Oral History

Interviewer

C. Hyde

Interviewee

Donna Jackman and Charmaine Blake

Location

Leicester

Transcription

Charmaine Blake: LUCA was very much seen as for the older people. It was a club but for our parents’ generation. It’s only later on, I think, our generation became involved in LUCA.
Donna Jackman: In the 80s
Charmaine: Yeah, so you would never want to go anywhere your parents were going were you, obviously, we were young people. It was only later on as we became older and a bit more conscious about our heritage LUCA became significant, ‘cause it was the only place that was identified for black Caribbean people. Later on we had The Workshop, which is now the African Caribbean Centre, but that was Thatcher’s time during the eighties and up to the riots…
Donna: But the group like the WISP, the West Indian Senior Citizens Project, and the Jamaica Service Group, they probably started by having their meetings there and it was out of LUCA that they formed and fought for and had the day centre.
Charmaine: As our parents started getting older there was that realisation about, well, what facilities are there going to be for elders really, I think, and that’s what grew out of WISP and those organisations in preparation really for when we’re going to need services like that, I think. But for the younger generation it was very much about, I think for me, fun. But of course, there was sort of discrepancies between maybe our parents’ generation and us coming up. It was much more broader for us, and then the riots in the mid-eighties, 82/83, where we were trying to get more facilities for young black people, that’s when somewhere like The Workshop came into being.

Duration

1min 49sec

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